That's Interesting

  • Inside Rome’s Secure Vault for Stolen Art

    Some of the art is real, some fake, but it’s all had a brush with the criminal underworld.

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  • The unique world of North Korea’s kids TV

    North Korean children get 30 minutes of dedicated programming every day, but it’s all carefully crafted to suit the country’s defiant, military-first philosophy.  BBC Monitoring’s North Korea expert Alistair Coleman takes a look.

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  • How one man spent 600 days walking the Silk Road to see the Caucasus and Central Asia by foot

    In August 2018, anthropology graduate Daniele Ventola left Italy to embark on the biggest adventure of his life — a journey to China along the Silk Road — on foot.

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  • 10,000 Vintage Recipe Books Are Now Digitized in The Internet Archive’s Cookbook & Home Economics Collection

    Cookbooks are windows into history—markers of class and caste, documents of daily life, and snapshots of regional and cultural identity at particular moments in time.

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  • Craft Beer in a Pandemic

    Brewing, like many industries, has had to adapt during the coronavirus pandemic. And whilst this can be a logistical nightmare, the current crisis might also present some new opportunities.

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  • High-Resolution Walking Tours of Italy’s Most Historic Places: The Colosseum, Pompeii, St. Peter’s Basilica & More

    Whether the Colosseum and Palatine Hill in Rome, St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City, and the towns of Pompeii (in two parts) and Herculaneum both ruined and preserved by Mt. Vesuvius, ProWalk’s videos show you all you’d see on an in-person waking tour. But they also include features like maps, marks in the timeline denoting each important site, and onscreen facts and explanations of the features of these historic places.

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  • A Short Introduction to Caravaggio, the Master Of Light

    Like many a great artist, the fortunes of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio rose and fell dramatically. After his death, his influence spread across the continent as followers called Caravaggisti took his extreme use of chiaroscuro abroad. He influenced Rubens, Rembrandt, and Velázquez—indeed, the entire Baroque period in European art history probably would never have happened without him. “With the exception of Michelangelo,” art historian Bernard Berenson wrote, “no other Italian painter exercised so great an influence.”

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  • What Did the Roman Emperors Look Like?

    “Using the neural-net tool Artbreeder, Photoshop and historical references, I have created photoreal portraits of Roman Emperors,” writes designer Daniel Voshart. “For this project, I have transformed, or restored (cracks, noses, ears etc.) 800 images of busts to make the 54 emperors of The Principate (27 BC to 285 AD).”

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  • Uredd Rest Area (Ureddplassen)

    Norway has built what may be the world’s most beautiful public toilet.

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  • One of the Oldest Buddhist Manuscripts Has Been Digitized & Put Online: Explore the Gandhara Scroll

    Buddhism goes way back — so far back, in fact, that we’re still examining important evidence of just how far back it goes.  At the the blog of the Library of Congress, you can read online the Gandhara Scroll which has been laboriously and carefully unrolled and scanned, and which, having originally been written about two millennia ago, ranks as one of the oldest Buddhist manuscripts currently known.

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