That's Interesting

  • High-Resolution Walking Tours of Italy’s Most Historic Places: The Colosseum, Pompeii, St. Peter’s Basilica & More

    Whether the Colosseum and Palatine Hill in Rome, St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City, and the towns of Pompeii (in two parts) and Herculaneum both ruined and preserved by Mt. Vesuvius, ProWalk’s videos show you all you’d see on an in-person waking tour. But they also include features like maps, marks in the timeline denoting each important site, and onscreen facts and explanations of the features of these historic places.

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  • A Short Introduction to Caravaggio, the Master Of Light

    Like many a great artist, the fortunes of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio rose and fell dramatically. After his death, his influence spread across the continent as followers called Caravaggisti took his extreme use of chiaroscuro abroad. He influenced Rubens, Rembrandt, and Velázquez—indeed, the entire Baroque period in European art history probably would never have happened without him. “With the exception of Michelangelo,” art historian Bernard Berenson wrote, “no other Italian painter exercised so great an influence.”

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  • What Did the Roman Emperors Look Like?

    “Using the neural-net tool Artbreeder, Photoshop and historical references, I have created photoreal portraits of Roman Emperors,” writes designer Daniel Voshart. “For this project, I have transformed, or restored (cracks, noses, ears etc.) 800 images of busts to make the 54 emperors of The Principate (27 BC to 285 AD).”

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  • Uredd Rest Area (Ureddplassen)

    Norway has built what may be the world’s most beautiful public toilet.

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  • One of the Oldest Buddhist Manuscripts Has Been Digitized & Put Online: Explore the Gandhara Scroll

    Buddhism goes way back — so far back, in fact, that we’re still examining important evidence of just how far back it goes.  At the the blog of the Library of Congress, you can read online the Gandhara Scroll which has been laboriously and carefully unrolled and scanned, and which, having originally been written about two millennia ago, ranks as one of the oldest Buddhist manuscripts currently known.

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  • View 250,000 British Paintings & Sculptures Free Online

    With a viral pandemic bringing travel bans and restrictions down on the entire world, the days of traipsing around the world for Instagram impressions, or saving and scraping for that vacation honeymoon, or making even more important journeys, may be on hold indefinitely. Fortunately, art galleries worldwide have been preparing their collections for independent lives online, with ultra-high-resolution photography; materials that rarely appear on view in any form; and more context than visitors typically get on a guided tour.

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  • Covering China Chris Buckley

    ThNew York Times correspondent Chris Buckley has been working and living in China for 24 years. He was in Wuhan in February during the lockdown when his visa expired. It hasn’t been renewed and he has since left the country. He tells Geraldine Doogue about the changes in China over the last two decades, stories he has covered and his time in Wuhan.

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  • Lose Yourself in a Mesmerizing, Meticulous Map of the Met

    The beloved New York museum comes alive in this massive and mysterious illustration.

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  • How the Man Who Invented Xbox Baked a 4,500-Year-Old Egyptian Sourdough

    It took three experts, two museums, and one clay pot to bake a truly ancient loaf.

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  • The National Emergency Library Makes 1.5 Million Books Free to Read Right Now

    While the coronavirus has closed physical libraries in countries all around the world, more resources for books open to the public on the internet. Most recently, we have the Internet Archive’s opening of the National Emergency Library, “a collection of books that supports emergency remote teaching, research activities, independent scholarship, and intellectual stimulation while universities, schools, training centers, and libraries are closed”.

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