That's Interesting

  • The heavens underground: the Soviet Union’s opulent metro stations, from Belarus to Uzbekistan

    Decorated with chandeliers, mosaics, and Lenin busts, the Soviet Union produced the most photographed transport system in the world. In this excerpt from Fuel’s latest book, Soviet Metro Stations, writer Owen Hatherley and photographer Christopher Herwig celebrate the metro’s expansive architectural legacy, travelling as far as Tashkent and Baku.

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  • The Complete Works of Hilma af Klint Will Get Published for the First Time in a Beautiful, Seven-Volume Collection

    The seven-volume series, published by Bokförlaget Stolpe, “is organized both chronologically and by theme, beginning with the spiritual sketches af Klint made in conjunction with The Five, a group of women who attended séances in hopes of obtaining messages from the dead.”

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  • Discover the remarkable buildings that shaped the Eastern Bloc

    The Calvert Journal ‘s Eastern bloc architecture series discusses their roundup of architectural experimentation.

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  • How one man spent 600 days walking the Silk Road to see the Caucasus and Central Asia by foot

    In August 2018, anthropology graduate Daniele Ventola left Italy to embark on the biggest adventure of his life — a journey to China along the Silk Road — on foot.

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  • Lowy Institute Live: In Conversation with General James Mattis and Sir Angus Houston

    On Thursday 15 October 2020, the Lowy Institute’s Executive Director Dr Michael Fullilove hosted an in conversation event via live video stream with General James Mattis, one of America’s most experienced and influential military leaders. They were joined by Sir Angus Houston, former Chief of the Australian Defence Force.

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  • Taxicab Geometry as a Vehicle for the Journey Toward Enlightenment

    In casual conversation, many (perhaps most) individuals are impatient with what they regard as slight distinctions of meaning. This impatience with fine-grained semantic sensitivity is reflected in the popularity of such pejorative expressions as “splitting hairs” and “just semantics.” The reigning attitude is that individuals who pay attention to apparently small differences in the definitions of words are pedantic and tedious. But slight differences in meaning can be surprisingly meaningful.

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  • Can Western universities survive without China?

    Some universities fear they have become too financially dependent on fee-paying Chinese students – and thanks to Covid-19, many of them are staying away this year. Salvatore Babones, an associate professor at the University of Sydney, says Australia is particularly vulnerable to this, while Vivienne Stern of Universities UK says it’s just one of a number of serious concerns for UK and US universities.

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  • The Strange Costumes of the Plague Doctors Who Treated 17th Century Victims of the Bubonic Plague

    In the 17th and 18th centuries,with the bubonic plague sweeping Europe, plague doctors wandered towns and countryside in a “fanciful-looking costume [that] typically consisted of a head-to-toe leather or wax-canvas garment,” writes the Public Domain Review, “large crystal glasses; and a long snout or bird beak, containing aromatic spices (such as camphor, mint, cloves, and myrrh), dried flowers (such as roses or carnations), or a vinegar sponge.”

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  • The Symmetry and Chaos of the World’s Megacities

    Architectural photographer Ryan Koopmans spent the past decade shooting hi-res photographs of the world’s biggest cities. The results are mind-blowing.

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  • An Illustrated Guide to Mean Things People Say About National Parks

    Artist Amber Share trawls disgruntled reviews on such platforms as Yelp, TripAdvisor, Google, and Facebook to mine for complaints about National Parks in USA.

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