That's Interesting

  • Why pessimism sounds smart

    Pessimism sounds smart because optimism often requires believing in unknown, unspecified future breakthroughs—which seems fanciful and naive.

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  • The Selective Laziness of Reasoning

    Discusses the research into reasoning which suggests that people use more stringent criteria when they evaluate others’ arguments than when they produce arguments themselves.

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  • CEO personality traits and structure of compensation

    An examination into the effects of a CEO’s big five personalities (openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism) on their annual compensation.

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  • Stanford study finds walking improves creativity

    Stanford researchers found that walking boosts creative inspiration. They examined creativity levels of people while they walked versus while they sat. A person’s creative output increased by an average of 60 percent when walking.

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  • Less but Better: Dieter Rams’ 10 Principles

    Dieter Rams is a man who not only reveres the simple things in life but has also sought to distill simplicity into everyday objects. While Rams will certainly be remembered for the hundreds of iconic and innovative products he designed while working for Braun and Vitsoe, his impact as a modern visionary ripples much further than the discipline through which he made his living.

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  • How Can Gaming Help Test Your Theory?

    Taken form a December 3, 2015, panel on “Testing Hypotheses: Escalation and Deterrence in Cyberspace,” at the Cyberspace and Deterrence Academic and Inter-Agency Symposium at the Elliot School of International Affairs, George Washington University, Washington, D.C

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  • Histomap: Visualizing the 4,000 Year History of Global Power

    A graphical timeline showing the history of the entire world over a 4,000 year time period which maps the ebb and flow of global power going all the way back to 2,000 B.C. on one coherent timeline.

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  • Exploring the Brain Activity Related to Missing Penalty Kicks: An fNIRS Study

    At vital moments in professional soccer matches, penalties were often missed. Psychological factors, such as anxiety and pressure, are among the critical causes of the mistakes, commonly known as choking under pressure. Nevertheless, the factors have not been fully explored. In this study, we used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to investigate the influence of the brain on this process.

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  • Why professional soccer players choke during penalty kicks

    A new study used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to measure brain activity as inexperienced and experienced soccer players took penalty kicks.

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  • Dunbar’s number: why my theory that humans can only maintain 150 friendships has withstood 30 years of scrutiny

    The evidence that personal social networks and natural communities approximate 150 in size, characterised by a very distinctive layered structure, has grown considerably in the past decade. We see it in telephone calling networks, Facebook groups, Christmas card lists, military fighting units and online gaming environments. The number holds for church congregations, Anglo-Saxon villages as listed in the Domesday Book and Bronze Age communities associated with stone circles.

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