That's Interesting

  • A Short Introduction to Caravaggio, the Master Of Light

    Like many a great artist, the fortunes of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio rose and fell dramatically. After his death, his influence spread across the continent as followers called Caravaggisti took his extreme use of chiaroscuro abroad. He influenced Rubens, Rembrandt, and Velázquez—indeed, the entire Baroque period in European art history probably would never have happened without him. “With the exception of Michelangelo,” art historian Bernard Berenson wrote, “no other Italian painter exercised so great an influence.”

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  • The Illusion of Wage Growth

    Despite a sharp spike in unemployment since March 2020, aggregate wage growth has accelerated. This acceleration has been almost entirely attributable to job losses among low-wage workers. Wage growth for those who remain employed has been flat. This means that, in the wake of the virus, evaluations of the labor market must rely on a dashboard of indicators, rather than any single measure, to paint a complete picture of the losses and the recovery.

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  • 5 (More) Ways Life Has Changed

    From smoking more cigarettes to stocking up on meatless meats, the pandemic has changed consumer behaviour in some unexpected ways.

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  • Can Western universities survive without China?

    Some universities fear they have become too financially dependent on fee-paying Chinese students – and thanks to Covid-19, many of them are staying away this year. Salvatore Babones, an associate professor at the University of Sydney, says Australia is particularly vulnerable to this, while Vivienne Stern of Universities UK says it’s just one of a number of serious concerns for UK and US universities.

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  • What Did the Roman Emperors Look Like?

    “Using the neural-net tool Artbreeder, Photoshop and historical references, I have created photoreal portraits of Roman Emperors,” writes designer Daniel Voshart. “For this project, I have transformed, or restored (cracks, noses, ears etc.) 800 images of busts to make the 54 emperors of The Principate (27 BC to 285 AD).”

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  • How Risky is Australian Household Debt?

    Household debt levels have increased considerably over the past 30 years, both in Australia and elsewhere. In Australia, and other countries with relatively high household indebtedness, this is consistently cited as a key risk to financial and macroeconomic stability.

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  • Uredd Rest Area (Ureddplassen)

    Norway has built what may be the world’s most beautiful public toilet.

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  • Stations of the X – 63 the yellow house

    GTK report from 1971 about the yellow house, the wacky kings cross pile (in macleay st) where you could live the dream of ‘art as life’.

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  • One of the Oldest Buddhist Manuscripts Has Been Digitized & Put Online: Explore the Gandhara Scroll

    Buddhism goes way back — so far back, in fact, that we’re still examining important evidence of just how far back it goes.  At the the blog of the Library of Congress, you can read online the Gandhara Scroll which has been laboriously and carefully unrolled and scanned, and which, having originally been written about two millennia ago, ranks as one of the oldest Buddhist manuscripts currently known.

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  • The Strange Costumes of the Plague Doctors Who Treated 17th Century Victims of the Bubonic Plague

    In the 17th and 18th centuries,with the bubonic plague sweeping Europe, plague doctors wandered towns and countryside in a “fanciful-looking costume [that] typically consisted of a head-to-toe leather or wax-canvas garment,” writes the Public Domain Review, “large crystal glasses; and a long snout or bird beak, containing aromatic spices (such as camphor, mint, cloves, and myrrh), dried flowers (such as roses or carnations), or a vinegar sponge.”

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