That's Interesting

  • It Takes a Lot of Thought and Planning to Paint a Train

    Over the last 50 years, Amtrak has seen many designs come and go.

    Read More
  • Hot Cheetos

    Richard Montañez walked into the Frito-Lay factory in Rancho Cucamonga, CA one day and filled a trash bag with unseasoned, cheeseless, Cheetos. He was a janitor and machine operator at the plant. But he and his wife had an idea. To create a spicy chip inspired by their Mexican roots: Hot … Cheetos.

    Read More
  • Ten ideas to reimagine Indonesia’s economy after COVID-19

    If Indonesia can quickly return to pre-pandemic growth rates, the country may become the world’s seventh-largest economy by 2030, from its 16th position in 2019, rising above Italy, Russia, South Korea, and others.

    Read More
  • The Herald’s photographic coverage over the years

    The Sydney Morning Herald celebrated 190 years on April 18, 2021. Photography has been part of the Herald newsroom since 1908 when it first published a photo under the headline ‘Australia welcomes America’s fleet’. To this day they continue to capture the events and the stories for their readers. Photography by the award winning Herald photographers, past and present.

    Read More
  • CIVIC Chat About Their Debut LP, Future Forecast

    Melbourne punks CIVIC drop the studio to chat about their long-awaited debut album Future Forecast. Coming off the back of their EP New Vietnam and a string of singles, the band’s debut is their first release on local label Flightless; it was also a recent Triple R Album Of The Week. Roland and Jim from the band run Teenage Hate co-host Tim Scott through the recording of the album (from corked trombones to last-minute covers) and preview their upcoming album launches.

    Read More
  • How Leonardo da Vinci Made His Magnificent Drawings Using Only a Metal Stylus, Pen & Ink, and Chalk

    The modern artist has what can seem like an unlimited range of materials from which to choose, a variety completely unknown to great Renaissance masters like Leonardo da Vinci. Few, if any, can say, however, that they have anything like the raw talent, ingenuity, and discipline that drove Leonardo to draw incessantly, constantly honing his techniques and exploiting every use of the tools and techniques available to him.

    Read More
  • Experience Footage of Roaring 1920s Berlin, Restored & Colorized with Artificial Intelligence

    Offered the chance to travel back in time to any city in any period, surely more than a few would choose Berlin in the 1920s. Ideally it would be Berlin in the mid-1920s: after much of the social and economic damage of the Great War had been repaired, but before the Great Depression reached Germany at the end of the decade, doing its part to enable the rise of Hitler. The closest experience to stepping in that time machine yet developed is a series of clips from Walther Ruttmann’s 1927 documentary Berlin: Symphony of a Metropolis, but smoothed out, scaled up, and colorized with the aid of applications powered by artificial intelligence.

    Read More
  • Mapping the World’s Key Maritime Choke Points

    Maritime transport is an essential part of international trade—approximately 80% of global merchandise is shipped via sea. Because of its importance, commercial shipping relies on strategic trade routes to move goods efficiently. These waterways are used by thousands of vessels a year—but it’s not always smooth sailing. In fact, there are certain points along these routes that pose a risk to the whole system. Here’s a look at the world’s most vulnerable maritime bottlenecks—also known as choke points.

    Read More
  • The Mathematics Behind Origami, the Ancient Japanese Art of Paper Folding

    The two characters at the core of origami (折り紙), one of the best-known Japanese words around the world, mean “folding” and “paper.” Given the variety and elaborateness of the constructions produced by origami masters over the past few centuries, the simplicity of the practice’s basic nature bears repeating. Those masters must develop no slight degree of manual dexterity, it goes without saying, but also a formidable mathematical understanding of their medium.

    Read More
  • The heavens underground: the Soviet Union’s opulent metro stations, from Belarus to Uzbekistan

    Decorated with chandeliers, mosaics, and Lenin busts, the Soviet Union produced the most photographed transport system in the world. In this excerpt from Fuel’s latest book, Soviet Metro Stations, writer Owen Hatherley and photographer Christopher Herwig celebrate the metro’s expansive architectural legacy, travelling as far as Tashkent and Baku.

    Read More
  • Select Topics

Show All